Project Description

What is an MRA?

MRA stands for Magnetic Resonance Imaging or MR Angiography. In an MRA scan, radio waves, a magnetic field, and a computer create a scan of your body parts to look for health issues. MRA is a type of MRI that looks specifically at the body’s blood vessels. Unlike a traditional angiogram, which requires inserting a catheter into the body, magnetic resonance angiography is a far less invasive and less painful test.


Why MRA?

Why Would You Get an MRA?

In many cases, MRA can provide information that can’t be obtained from an X-ray, ultrasound or computed tomography (CT) scan. MRA imaging helps a doctor diagnose a disease or injury, and it can monitor how well you’re doing with treatment. In this test the blood vessels in many different parts of your body like brain, neck, heart, chest, arms, legs, abdomen, belly, and … are checked.


During MRA

What happens during MRA imaging (magnetic resonance angiography)?

Magnetic Resonance Angiography might be done on an outpatient basis or during an emergency clinic stay. Totally, magnetic resonance angiography follows this procedure:

  1. You will take off any clothing, jewelry, or other objects that may interfere with the MRA scan and put on a gown.
  2. If you need a contrast dye to make blood vessels easier to see, this will be given through an IV (Intravenous therapy is a therapy that delivers fluids directly into a vein).
  3. You will be positioned on a test table directly outside the MRA scanner.
  4. The table will slide into position, placing you inside the MRA scanner.
  5. You should lie still during the scanning process. Any movements can blur the images and cause the results to be less exact.
  6. The MRA scanner typically makes a lot of noise, including loud humming noises, so don’t be frightened.
  7. The full scan may take an hour or longer. This will depend on the sort and number of blood vessels that your healthcare provider wishes to inspect.

The MRA scan normally causes no side effects or complications. If it is done on an outpatient basis, you are commonly allowed to leave after the magnetic resonance angiography. Your medicinal services supplier will probably plan a subsequent arrangement to review the results of the test.

What Happens During MRA Imaging (Magnetic Resonance Angiography)?

Magnetic Resonance Angiography might be done on an outpatient basis or during an emergency clinic stay. Totally, magnetic resonance angiography follows this procedure:

  1. You will take off any clothing, jewelry, or other objects that may interfere with the MRA scan and put on a gown.
  2. If you need a contrast dye to make blood vessels easier to see, this will be given through an IV (Intravenous therapy is a therapy that delivers fluids directly into a vein).
  3. You will be positioned on a test table directly outside the MRA scanner.
  4. The table will slide into position, placing you inside the MRA scanner.
  5. You should lie still during the scanning process. Any movements can blur the images and cause the results to be less exact.
  6. The MRA scanner typically makes a lot of noise, including loud humming noises, so don’t be frightened.
  7. The full scan may take an hour or longer. This will depend on the sort and number of blood vessels that your healthcare provider wishes to inspect.

The MRA scan normally causes no side effects or complications. If it is done on an outpatient basis, you are commonly allowed to leave after the magnetic resonance angiography. Your medicinal services supplier will probably plan a subsequent arrangement to review the results of the test.

We Will Take Care of The Rest!

What About the Results?

The Radiologist may talk to you about the results of your MRA right after the test. Complete results are usually available for your doctor within 24 hours.